lunes, 1 de julio de 2013

La Primavera en Egipto

La Primavera Arabe en Egipto empieza a volverse amarga. Mohamed Morsi, otro muñeco de torta que comienza a tambalear. Recordemos: (a) En 2011, mucho twitter y facebook convocando a las clases medias a rebelarse contra el malo de Mubarak; (b) Los caceroleros vencen en la batalla de Tahrir Square: toda la prensa corporativa occidental alienta los vientos de democracia y libertad; se habla de Primavera Arabe y cosas así; cae Mubarak; (c) hay elecciones: los candidatos de los caceroleros no pasan del 3%; ganan los Hermanos Musulmanes (el candidato de Mubarak sale segundo, a un punto); (d) pasa un año y Muhamad Morsi hace lo posible por volver a la Edad Media, siempre de la mano del FMI, claro. A un año de su asunción en el poder, una banda de salafistas sunníes, envalentonados desde el púlpito, asesinan a dos religiosos shiítas. Goma. Incendios varios. Vuelta a Tahrir Square. En las sombras, el ejército egipcio sonríe en silencio.

Acá va una seguidilla de cuatro noticias sobre los acontecimientos recientes por parte de PressTV. La importante es la última. Quedan 48 horas.

(1) Sunday protests in Egypt leave 16 people dead: Health Ministry

The Egyptian Health Ministry says 16 people have been killed in massive protests across the North African country on Sunday.

The ministry said on Monday that eight people were killed in clashes between supporters and opponents of Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi outside the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in the capital, Cairo.

Overnight, the demonstrators threw petrol bombs and rocks at armed guards who were inside the building.

On Monday morning, the protesters attacked the headquarters in the eastern Moqattam District and looted it. The six-story building was also set on fire.

Meanwhile, three other people died in the central province of Assiut and one each in Fayoum, Beni Sueif and Kafr el-Sheikh provinces.

One demonstrator suffocated to death at the protest outside the Presidential Palace in Cairo while another died of injuries in the city of Alexandria, the ministry added.

The massive protests on Sunday came on the first anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration as president following the 2011 revolution that toppled the Western-backed regime of Hosni Mubarak.

Earlier on Monday, the opposition set July 2 as a deadline for Morsi to step down.
“We give Mohamed Morsi until 5:00 p.m. (1500 GMT) on Tuesday, July 2, to leave power, allowing state institutions to prepare for early presidential elections,” said a statement by Egypt’s opposition movement of Tamarod.

The Egyptian opposition movement warned that if Morsi does not resign until the deadline, the protesters will begin “a complete civil disobedience campaign.”

In a televised address on June 26, Morsi said the polarization of the country’s political life is “threatening to paralyze” Egypt.

He acknowledged that he had made some mistakes during his first year in office but called for national reconciliation, saying that he was open to cooperating with the opposition on constitutional reform.


(2) Egypt opposition sets July 2 deadline for President Morsi to quit

Egypt’s opposition has set July 2 as a deadline for President Mohamed Morsi to step down, amid ongoing protests against the government.

“We give Mohamed Morsi until 5:00 p.m. (1500 GMT) on Tuesday July 2 to leave power, allowing state institutions to prepare for early presidential elections,” said a Monday statement by Egypt’s opposition movement of Tamarod.

Cairo and other Egyptian cities witnessed major demonstrations for and against President Morsi on Sunday. Reports say seven people died and hundreds more were wounded in unrest.
The Egyptian opposition movement warned that if Morsi does not resign until the deadline, the protesters will begin “a complete civil disobedience campaign.”

Tamarod also urged “state institutions including the army, the police and the judiciary to clearly side with the popular will as represented by the crowds” on Sunday.

The movement rejected presidential calls for dialogue, saying, “There is no alternative other than the peaceful end of power of the Muslim Brotherhood and its representative, Mohamed Morsi.”

The massive protests on Sunday came on the first anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration as president following the 2011 revolution that toppled the Western-backed regime of Hosni Mubarak.

In a televised address on June 26, Morsi said the polarization of the country’s political life is “threatening to paralyze” Egypt.

He acknowledged that he had made some mistakes during his first year in office but called for national reconciliation, saying that he was open to cooperating with the opposition on constitutional reform.

On June 27, Egypt’s main opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front (NSF), rejected the president’s offer.

The NSF claimed that Morsi had failed to take responsibility for the deep political polarization in the country and the failed economy.

Morsi’s supporters, however, say the president is cleansing Egyptian institutions of corruption but needs time to realize the ideals of the revolution.

(3) Four Egyptian ministers quit Morsi's cabinet amid protests


Four Egyptian ministers have quitted the cabinet of President Mohamed Morsi following the massive protests in the country, a top government official says.

The senior Egyptian official told AFP on Monday that ministers of tourism, environment, communication and legal affairs have tendered their letters of resignation to Prime Minister Hisham Qandil.

The resignations come a day after the capital Cairo and other Egyptian cities witnessed major demonstrations for and against Morsi on Sunday. Some 16 people died and hundreds more were wounded in the unrest.

Tourism Minister Hisham Zazou had already sought to step down in June after Morsi appointed Adel al-Khayat as governor of the city of Luxor. However, Zazou came back to work last week after Khayat quit.

The massive protests on Sunday came on the first anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration as president following the 2011 revolution that toppled the Western-backed regime of Hosni Mubarak.

The demonstrators are angry at Morsi's handling of the economy and failure to fulfill his electoral promises. The organizers of the major demonstration for Sunday claim that more than 22 million people have signed petition for the resignation of the president and a snap election.

Anti-government protests were also staged in the coastal city of Alexandria, the Nile Delta cities of Mansura, Menuf, Tanta and Mahalla, the canal cities of Suez and Port Said as well as Zagazig.

Meanwhile earlier on Monday, the opposition set July 2 as a deadline for Morsi to step down.



(4) People’s demands must be met: Egypt military chief
 
Egypt Army Chief Gen Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi says the military will not be involved in government or politics as protesters in Egypt call on military to openly express its support for them.

Sisi, however, said Egyptians have expressed their will in an unprecedented way, giving Egyptian politicians 48 hours to meet demands of people.

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